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Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
Today would be the 184th birthday of pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Born in Kingston-on-Thames, England in 1830, Muybridge emigrated to the United States at a young age. His groundbreaking animal locomotion studies helped pave the way for motion pictures, and his “zoopraxiscope” of 1879 is considered by many to be the first movie projector. A more dubious achievement, Muybridge also literally got away with murder, after a San Francisco jury acquitted him of killing his wife’s lover in 1874.Muybridge moved to Philadelphia in 1880, where he befriended the painter Thomas Eakins, also an ardent photographer, who often worked alongside Muybridge, producing studies of animals and humans in motion. Muybridge returned to England in 1900 and died in his hometown four years later.“ ‘Ike’ and ‘Maggie’ Racing,” 1887, by Eadward Muybridge

Today would be the 184th birthday of pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Born in Kingston-on-Thames, England in 1830, Muybridge emigrated to the United States at a young age. His groundbreaking animal locomotion studies helped pave the way for motion pictures, and his “zoopraxiscope” of 1879 is considered by many to be the first movie projector. A more dubious achievement, Muybridge also literally got away with murder, after a San Francisco jury acquitted him of killing his wife’s lover in 1874.

Muybridge moved to Philadelphia in 1880, where he befriended the painter Thomas Eakins, also an ardent photographer, who often worked alongside Muybridge, producing studies of animals and humans in motion. Muybridge returned to England in 1900 and died in his hometown four years later.

‘Ike’ and ‘Maggie’ Racing,” 1887, by Eadward Muybridge

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