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Rodin Museum

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Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
I HAVE A DREAM: “1963 is not an end, but a beginning.”—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addressing more than 200,000 people in Washington, D.C., on August 28, 1963In the early 1980s, John Woodrow Wilson created an eight-foot-tall bronze portrait head of Dr. King absorbed in thought for a park in Buffalo, New York. Inspired by Buddhist, Olmec, and Easter Island examples, the artist explored ideas for a monumental sculpture that would capture both King’s humanity and the universality of his ideals, as seen in this drawing study for the project. www.philamuseum.org“Martin Luther King, Jr.,” 1981, by John Woodrow Wilson (Philadelphia Museum of Art: 125th Anniversary Acquisition. Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Friends of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in honor of the 125th Anniversary of the Museum and in celebration of African American art, 2000-34-1)

I HAVE A DREAM: “1963 is not an end, but a beginning.”—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addressing more than 200,000 people in Washington, D.C., on August 28, 1963

In the early 1980s, John Woodrow Wilson created an eight-foot-tall bronze portrait head of Dr. King absorbed in thought for a park in Buffalo, New York. Inspired by Buddhist, Olmec, and Easter Island examples, the artist explored ideas for a monumental sculpture that would capture both King’s humanity and the universality of his ideals, as seen in this drawing study for the project. www.philamuseum.org

Martin Luther King, Jr.,” 1981, by John Woodrow Wilson (Philadelphia Museum of Art: 125th Anniversary Acquisition. Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Friends of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in honor of the 125th Anniversary of the Museum and in celebration of African American art, 2000-34-1)

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