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Welcome

Rodin Museum

Perelman Building

Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
ZOOM-IN: How Do You Keep Your Loved Ones Close?
Delicate ivory portrait miniatures like these once helped Americans keep their loved ones—quite literally—close to the chest.  Hinting at ties that bind, Americans often had themselves painted in miniature with the ones they loved clasped in miniature around their necks. Often exchanged as secret tokens between lovers and courting couples or worn to commemorate the recently deceased, such portraits often seemed to live and breathe alongside their wearers. The velvety texture of the ivory mimicked the look and feel of human skin at the same time that the painted eyes of these portraits seemed to shimmer and cheeks flush with what one writer called the “living light” transmitted through the translucent ivory. The organic material was even able to catch up to human body temperature when worn directly against the skin, making these portraits pretty hot presents when exchanged by secret flames. –Katie Pfohl, Barra Fellow in American Art
"Portrait of Maria Bassett", 1801, James Peale http://ow.ly/meWsV
"Abraham Woodside", 1810, Attributed to John Archibald Woodside http://ow.ly/meWL0

ZOOM-IN: How Do You Keep Your Loved Ones Close?

Delicate ivory portrait miniatures like these once helped Americans keep their loved ones—quite literally—close to the chest.  Hinting at ties that bind, Americans often had themselves painted in miniature with the ones they loved clasped in miniature around their necks. Often exchanged as secret tokens between lovers and courting couples or worn to commemorate the recently deceased, such portraits often seemed to live and breathe alongside their wearers. The velvety texture of the ivory mimicked the look and feel of human skin at the same time that the painted eyes of these portraits seemed to shimmer and cheeks flush with what one writer called the “living light” transmitted through the translucent ivory. The organic material was even able to catch up to human body temperature when worn directly against the skin, making these portraits pretty hot presents when exchanged by secret flames. –Katie Pfohl, Barra Fellow in American Art

"Portrait of Maria Bassett", 1801, James Peale http://ow.ly/meWsV

"Abraham Woodside", 1810, Attributed to John Archibald Woodside http://ow.ly/meWL0

Notes

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    CAN WE ALL PLEASE DO THIS
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