Previous SlideNext Slide

Welcome

Rodin Museum

Perelman Building

Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
WOMEN TAKE THE REINS!
In celebration of the passage of the 19th Amendment 94 years ago today, we celebrate female painters like Mary Cassatt who struggled for recognition and women’s rights in a male-dominated world, leading the fight for women’s suffrage and social enfranchisement.“Woman and Child Driving”,1881, Mary Cassatt 
CURATOR’S COLUMN:
In Mary Cassatt’s Woman and Child Driving, Cassatt puts a woman—her sister Lydia—in the driver’s seat. Gloved hands grasping the reigns, Lydia is in firm command of both buggy and painting. Cassatt’s restrained composition, however, betrays the real life restrictions that unmarried women like Cassatt and her sister often faced. Despite Cassatt’s trailblazing success as a woman artist of renown in both Europe and the United States, she was still subject to the same strictures faced by middle and upper class women of the day, whose access to Paris’s public parks and boulevards, such as the Bois de Boulogne, shown here, was often restricted by the rules of propriety. Cassatt’s Bois de Boulogne is not the wide open public space so often shown by male artists of the period, but rather a close-cropped and seemingly impenetrable mass of dense foliage to which the viewer is largely denied access. Lydia’s clear sense of self-possession and determined expression do battle with this tangled backdrop, evoking Cassatt’s own struggle to gain recognition and acceptance within a male-dominated art world to which she was often denied access, as well as the larger struggle for women’s rights in the decades leading up to women’s suffrage and increasing political and social enfranchisement. 
–Katie Pfohl, Barra Foundation Fellow in American Art

WOMEN TAKE THE REINS!

In celebration of the passage of the 19th Amendment 94 years ago today, we celebrate female painters like Mary Cassatt who struggled for recognition and women’s rights in a male-dominated world, leading the fight for women’s suffrage and social enfranchisement.

“Woman and Child Driving”,1881, Mary Cassatt 

CURATOR’S COLUMN:

In Mary Cassatt’s Woman and Child Driving, Cassatt puts a woman—her sister Lydia—in the driver’s seat. Gloved hands grasping the reigns, Lydia is in firm command of both buggy and painting. Cassatt’s restrained composition, however, betrays the real life restrictions that unmarried women like Cassatt and her sister often faced. Despite Cassatt’s trailblazing success as a woman artist of renown in both Europe and the United States, she was still subject to the same strictures faced by middle and upper class women of the day, whose access to Paris’s public parks and boulevards, such as the Bois de Boulogne, shown here, was often restricted by the rules of propriety. Cassatt’s Bois de Boulogne is not the wide open public space so often shown by male artists of the period, but rather a close-cropped and seemingly impenetrable mass of dense foliage to which the viewer is largely denied access. Lydia’s clear sense of self-possession and determined expression do battle with this tangled backdrop, evoking Cassatt’s own struggle to gain recognition and acceptance within a male-dominated art world to which she was often denied access, as well as the larger struggle for women’s rights in the decades leading up to women’s suffrage and increasing political and social enfranchisement. 

–Katie Pfohl, Barra Foundation Fellow in American Art

Notes

  1. chloe-liked-olivia reblogged this from philamuseum
  2. greybanshee reblogged this from philamuseum and added:
    I’m not a huge fan of Mary Cassatt’s work, but I found this short read fascinating.
  3. diophoros reblogged this from philamuseum
  4. tishybear reblogged this from philamuseum
  5. byhapnstance reblogged this from philamuseum
  6. bastetsbard reblogged this from lavieencerise
  7. lavieencerise reblogged this from monaeltahawy
  8. imagineacircle reblogged this from philamuseum
  9. monaeltahawy reblogged this from jumpinpunkins
  10. givernyslily reblogged this from philamuseum
  11. skitch91 reblogged this from philamuseum
  12. jumpinpunkins reblogged this from philamuseum
  13. suheeyou reblogged this from philamuseum
  14. auntiesanonymous reblogged this from philamuseum
  15. runeceltiche reblogged this from philamuseum
  16. lllgamgamlll reblogged this from philamuseum
  17. painted-fire said: Isn’t it “reins” when referring to the pieces of leather? “take the reins,” not “take the reigns”
  18. audra-and-mcdonalds reblogged this from philamuseum
  19. annecathbern reblogged this from philamuseum