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Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
manpodcast:

Mark Bradford, Scorched Earth, 2006.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Bradford. A mid-career survey of his artwork is on view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. (Also, a couple of large-scale works are installed across the street from SFMOMA, at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.) The exhibition was curated for the Wexner Center for the Arts by Christopher Bedford in 2010. The show has traveled to the ICA Boston, the MCA Chicago and the Dallas Museum of Art. San Francisco is its final stop.
Bradford and I discuss:
The extent to which his work has been received through his biography — or at least through one particular part of his biography;
What he thought of MAN’s three-part review of the exhibition at the Wexner (gasp!);
How his engagement with abstract painting runs through a strikingly different art historical line than most American artists;
Two landmark Bradford works that address identity: Crow (2003/09) and Pinocchio is On Fire (2010); and
The surprising reason(s) that art education is so important to Bradford and why he has made working with high schoolers an important part of his artistic career.
This week’s program also features something new: Sound! Over the course of today’s program and each MAN Podcast, you’ll hear the entire piece artist Steve Roden made for the show.  Roden is a painter, a sculptor and he works in various time-based media. Curator Howard Fox organized a 20-year retrospective of Roden’s work for Pasadena’s The Armory Center for the Arts in 2010. Roden’s work is in the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Blanton Museum at the University of Texas and more. He joins me to talk about what he made for The MAN Podcast and about his work.
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program by clicking here.
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. For images of the works discussed on this week’s show, click here.

manpodcast:

Mark Bradford, Scorched Earth, 2006.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Bradford. A mid-career survey of his artwork is on view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. (Also, a couple of large-scale works are installed across the street from SFMOMA, at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.) The exhibition was curated for the Wexner Center for the Arts by Christopher Bedford in 2010. The show has traveled to the ICA Boston, the MCA Chicago and the Dallas Museum of Art. San Francisco is its final stop.

Bradford and I discuss:

  • The extent to which his work has been received through his biography — or at least through one particular part of his biography;
  • What he thought of MAN’s three-part review of the exhibition at the Wexner (gasp!);
  • How his engagement with abstract painting runs through a strikingly different art historical line than most American artists;
  • Two landmark Bradford works that address identity: Crow (2003/09) and Pinocchio is On Fire (2010); and
  • The surprising reason(s) that art education is so important to Bradford and why he has made working with high schoolers an important part of his artistic career.

This week’s program also features something new: Sound! Over the course of today’s program and each MAN Podcast, you’ll hear the entire piece artist Steve Roden made for the show.  Roden is a painter, a sculptor and he works in various time-based media. Curator Howard Fox organized a 20-year retrospective of Roden’s work for Pasadena’s The Armory Center for the Arts in 2010. Roden’s work is in the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Blanton Museum at the University of Texas and more. He joins me to talk about what he made for The MAN Podcast and about his work.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program by clicking here.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. For images of the works discussed on this week’s show, click here.

(via 3rdofmay)

Notes

  1. christineonherown reblogged this from 3rdofmay and added:
    I have always been a fan of Mark Bradford — he did an exceptional installation with artist Ruben Ochoa for a local...
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