Previous SlideNext Slide

Welcome

Rodin Museum

Perelman Building

Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
ZoomInfo
ZoomInfo

Did you know that Jean Léon Gérôme and James Abbott McNeill Whistler weren’t impressed with each other’s artistic abilities? The two were contemporaries, but Gérôme stuck to more traditional academic painting while Whistler strayed from that style. As a sign of their rivalry, Gérôme once painted an image of a lion snapping at a butterfly. (He often depicted himself as a lion because of his middle name, and Whistler often signed his paintings with a butterfly.) Which one do you think is better?

Portal of the Green Mosque (Sentinel at the Sultan’s Tomb),” c. 1870, by Jean Léon Gérôme

Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks,” 1864, by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

Staff Pick: Botticelli’s “Portrait of a Young Man, possibly Giuliano de’ Medici”This portrait may represent Giuliano de’ Medici, who was assassinated on Easter Sunday in 1478 in a conspiracy against the Medici family and their governance of Florence. Learn more about the powerful Medici family in our newest installation, “Florence, Cradle of the Renaissance.” “Portrait of a Young Man, possibly Giuliano de’ Medici,” 1465–70, by Sandro Botticelli

Staff Pick: Botticelli’s “Portrait of a Young Man, possibly Giuliano de’ Medici”

This portrait may represent Giuliano de’ Medici, who was assassinated on Easter Sunday in 1478 in a conspiracy against the Medici family and their governance of Florence. Learn more about the powerful Medici family in our newest installation, “Florence, Cradle of the Renaissance.”

Portrait of a Young Man, possibly Giuliano de’ Medici,” 1465–70, by Sandro Botticelli

Throwback Thursday: What do you think of this early redesign for the Museum? To see the final design by Frank Gehry, visit the exhibition “Making a Classic Modern: Frank Gehry’s Master Plan for the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” now in its final weeks.Rendering © Gehry Partners, LLP

Throwback Thursday: What do you think of this early redesign for the Museum? To see the final design by Frank Gehry, visit the exhibition “Making a Classic Modern: Frank Gehry’s Master Plan for the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” now in its final weeks.

Rendering © Gehry Partners, LLP

Next Wednesday night, get a sneak peek at “The Body Lautrec,” which will premiere at this year’s Fringearts Festival. Physical theater artists Aaron Cromie and Mary Tuomanen bring you a voyeuristic look into the world of belle epoche painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seating is limited.Photo by Plate 3 Photography. Pictured: Aaron Cromie

Next Wednesday night, get a sneak peek at “The Body Lautrec,” which will premiere at this year’s Fringearts Festival. Physical theater artists Aaron Cromie and Mary Tuomanen bring you a voyeuristic look into the world of belle epoche painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seating is limited.

Photo by Plate 3 Photography. Pictured: Aaron Cromie

Happy birthday Alfred Hitchcock! In his films, Hitchcock was known for making the comfortable strange and the strange comfortable. The best example of this is his masterpiece thriller, “The Birds.” Okuhara Seiko took a similar approach to her depiction of these moor hens. Have you ever thought a scary movie had a seemingly normal premise?”Two Moor Hens,” c. 1900–1913, by Okuhara Seiko

Happy birthday Alfred Hitchcock! In his films, Hitchcock was known for making the comfortable strange and the strange comfortable. The best example of this is his masterpiece thriller, “The Birds.” Okuhara Seiko took a similar approach to her depiction of these moor hens. Have you ever thought a scary movie had a seemingly normal premise?

Two Moor Hens,” c. 1900–1913, by Okuhara Seiko

Who is this man, and what’s his story? He’s holding a sword and has a dagger, so he could be a palace guard or maybe the ruler himself. Join us for storytelling and around-the-world-travel this week at Art Splash.”The Moorish Chief,” 1878, by Eduard CharlemontArt Splash is presented by PNC Arts Alive.

Who is this man, and what’s his story? He’s holding a sword and has a dagger, so he could be a palace guard or maybe the ruler himself. Join us for storytelling and around-the-world-travel this week at Art Splash.

The Moorish Chief,” 1878, by Eduard Charlemont

Art Splash is presented by PNC Arts Alive.

What do you think our Museum walls would say if they had a voice? PMA Members and their guests can get an idea on August 23 at “If These Walls Could Talk: The History of Your Museum.” Discover the Museum’s rich history from our Centennial Exhibition origins to our transition into the new millennium. Membership and reservations required.
Photo: Installation of the Grand Salon of the Château de Draveil in gallery 260 of the Museum, circa 1936

What do you think our Museum walls would say if they had a voice? PMA Members and their guests can get an idea on August 23 at “If These Walls Could Talk: The History of Your Museum.” Discover the Museum’s rich history from our Centennial Exhibition origins to our transition into the new millennium. Membership and reservations required.


Photo: Installation of the Grand Salon of the Château de Draveil in gallery 260 of the Museum, circa 1936

Load more posts