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Philadelphia Museum of Art | Our Story

Sitting atop some very famous steps, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States.

Our facilities include our landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. We welcome you to enjoy a variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.
Woman Crush Wednesday: We love good eighteenth-century gossip. Emma Hart, a beautiful woman of modest means, gained fame through her liaisons with English aristocrats. While married to Sir William Hamilton, British envoy to Naples, she openly carried on a stormy romance with the naval hero Admiral Lord Nelson. In her youth, she was one of artist George Romney’s favorite models. “Portrait of Emma Hart (later Lady Hamilton) as Miranda,” 1785 or 1786, George Romney

Woman Crush Wednesday: We love good eighteenth-century gossip. Emma Hart, a beautiful woman of modest means, gained fame through her liaisons with English aristocrats. While married to Sir William Hamilton, British envoy to Naples, she openly carried on a stormy romance with the naval hero Admiral Lord Nelson. In her youth, she was one of artist George Romney’s favorite models.

Portrait of Emma Hart (later Lady Hamilton) as Miranda,” 1785 or 1786, George Romney

Augustus Saint-Gaudens modeled the face of his sculpture “Diana” on his mistress Davida Clark. You can also see her handsome features on another work in the Museum’s collection. Do you know which one? Click here to find out.Close-up of “Diana” after recent conservation work. Learn more about this project here.

Augustus Saint-Gaudens modeled the face of his sculpture “Diana” on his mistress Davida Clark. You can also see her handsome features on another work in the Museum’s collection. Do you know which one? Click here to find out.

Close-up of “Diana” after recent conservation work. Learn more about this project here.

PMA Members, what do you miss most about your childhood? Think about it on August 7 during our members-only tour “Kidding Around,” which looks at the history and influences of depictions of childhood in our collection. Free with membership and reservations.”The Seesaw,” 1791–92, by Francisco Goya

PMA Members, what do you miss most about your childhood? Think about it on August 7 during our members-only tour “Kidding Around,” which looks at the history and influences of depictions of childhood in our collection. Free with membership and reservations.

The Seesaw,” 1791–92, by Francisco Goya

Happy birthday to groundbreaking artist Marcel Duchamp. Did you know that the Philadelphia Museum of Art houses the world’s largest and most important collection of Duchamp’s work? Check it out in the galleries and on our website.Gallery view, including “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass),” 1915-23, Marcel Duchamp. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp Update July 17, 2012: © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Succession Marcel Duchamp

Happy birthday to groundbreaking artist Marcel Duchamp. Did you know that the Philadelphia Museum of Art houses the world’s largest and most important collection of Duchamp’s work? Check it out in the galleries and on our website.

Gallery view, including “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass),” 1915-23, Marcel Duchamp. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp Update July 17, 2012: © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Succession Marcel Duchamp

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More Art Monday: Golden Oldies
A meticulous conservation project recently repaired “Diana” and restored the sculpture’s gilding. How does her luster compare to these golden treasures?

Diana,” 1892–93, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens

White Tara,” 18th century, Mongolia or China

Joan of Arc,” c. 1874, by Emmanuel Frémiet

Garuda,” c. 1700–50, Tibet

Candelabrum (one of a pair), c. 1800, France

Recumbent Stag,” early 17th century, Germany

Seated Bodhisattva,” early 8th century, China

Portions of an Armor Garniture, c. 1550, Germany

More Art Monday is brought to you by ART 24/7.

Think you know Picasso? “Picasso Prints: Myths, Minotaurs, and Muses” provides fascinating insights into the artist’s life and passion for the world of classical antiquity. See the exhibition before it closes on August 3.“Portrait of Pablo Picasso, Paris,” 1933, by Albert Eugene Gallatin

Think you know Picasso?

Picasso Prints: Myths, Minotaurs, and Muses” provides fascinating insights into the artist’s life and passion for the world of classical antiquity. See the exhibition before it closes on August 3.

Portrait of Pablo Picasso, Paris,” 1933, by Albert Eugene Gallatin

We’re excited about “Nachtstilleben (Night Still Life)” by Turner Prize–winning photographer Wolfgang Tillmans. Wondering why? Come and see our group show “In Dialogue: Wolfgang Tillmans” for insights into this picture and some intriguing ideas about photography.Gallery view, including “Nachtstilleben (Night Still Life),” 2011 (negative), 2013 (print), by Wolfgang Tillmans and “Black Kites,” 1997, Gabriel Orozco © Gabriel Orozco

We’re excited about “Nachtstilleben (Night Still Life)” by Turner Prize–winning photographer Wolfgang Tillmans. Wondering why? Come and see our group show “In Dialogue: Wolfgang Tillmans” for insights into this picture and some intriguing ideas about photography.

Gallery view, including “Nachtstilleben (Night Still Life),” 2011 (negative), 2013 (print), by Wolfgang Tillmans and “Black Kites,” 1997, Gabriel Orozco © Gabriel Orozco

Did you know that early experiments in flash photography involved photographers filling a tray with magnesium powder, putting it on their heads, and igniting it to create a small explosion? Eventually, photographers mounted the tray to a stick to lift it—a bit more safely—above their heads. Learn more about how early photographers experimented with flash in this interesting piece from NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Then come visit “Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century” at the Museum. But hurry—the exhibition closes August 3.”Midnight at the Bowery Mission Breadline,” 1909, by Lewis W. Hine

Did you know that early experiments in flash photography involved photographers filling a tray with magnesium powder, putting it on their heads, and igniting it to create a small explosion? Eventually, photographers mounted the tray to a stick to lift it—a bit more safely—above their heads. Learn more about how early photographers experimented with flash in this interesting piece from NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Then come visit “Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century” at the Museum. But hurry—the exhibition closes August 3.

Midnight at the Bowery Mission Breadline,” 1909, by Lewis W. Hine

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